Warts on hands and feet

Warts are caused by viruses. Everyone can get warts on their hands and feet, but this is most common in school-aged children. Warts usually go away by themselves, but it can take time.

The warts are probably contaminated both through skin contact and through damp towels or through wet floors in showers and changing rooms.

Symptoms of warts on hand and feet

Foot warts are round, slightly raised, have a hard edge and are a little softer in the middle. Sometimes small black dots appear in the wart.

Hand warts are slightly more outstanding than foot warts and can look like tiny cauliflower heads.

When and where should I seek care?

Warts on hands and feet are harmless and usually do not need to be treated. They disappear by themselves in most people. Warts can go away in a few months but sometimes it can take several years.

Contact a health care center if any of the following is true of you:

  • You have an outgrowth on one hand or foot and are unsure if it is a wart. At the health center, they can assess whether it is a wart and give advice on how to treat it yourself.
  • You have warts that are sore, bleeding or cause a lot of trouble.
  • You have warts in places other than hands and feet.

You should contact your healthcare provider for help with your warts if you have diabetes.

If it is a weekend, you can wait until it is every day. You can contact many receptions by logging in.

What can I do for myself?

There are some things you can do to relieve the hassles and treat your warts.

Hurry up the healing with ointment

You can try to speed up the healing by treating with acetic acid.

There are antacids that you use once a day, twice a day or once a week. Care agents are available as a liquid and patch.

Start by soaking the wart in warm water. Then file it down with a nail file or foot file as much as it can without it starting to bleed. Then you put on spring remedies. Follow the operating instructions carefully.

When it comes to children, there are different age limits for different means. Ask your pharmacist if you are not sure what to choose.

Freeze the wart

A quicker way to treat warts on hands and feet is to freeze warts.

There are various means, for example, spray, pin, and gel. Usually, treatment is enough. Follow the operating instructions carefully.

When it comes to children, there are different age limits for different means. Ask your pharmacist if you are not sure what to choose.

Relief patch

You can use special patches that relieve the pressure on the wound if it hurts. The patches are available for purchase at, for example, pharmacies.

Avoid infection

Some are more susceptible than others and it can be difficult to avoid being infected.

To reduce the risk of infection, do not use other people’s towels and shoes. You should avoid going barefoot in public baths and showers.

You should also not poke or scratch your warts.

You should understand the information

In order for you to be involved in your care and treatment, it is important that you understand the information you receive from the healthcare staff. Ask questions if you don’t understand. For example, you should get information about treatment options and how long you may have to wait for care and treatment.

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